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BR A N D AV E. ST U DIOS CON T EN T

in good taste
PRESENTED BY

Toppings that Add
Flavor, Not Calories
SPONSORED CONTENT BY KATHERINE LEWIS

From its centuriesold building blocks
of chickpeas, tahini
and garlic, today's
hummus has countless
interpretations,
including sweet
dessert flavors, such
as chocolate hummus;
spicy kinds made with
peppers; and dazzling
hot-pink beetroot
hummus. Chickpeas
are a great way to add
more plant-based
protein to your diet,
and they’re a good
source of fiber too.

Toppings and condiments can subtly

A bit of quick research in the grocery

sabotage an otherwise healthy meal:

aisles pays off. “Before using any

Dipping baked chicken in ranch dressing

condiment, be sure to read the label –

can add hundreds of calories, and

opt out of anything that lists sugar as

brushing teriyaki sauce over salmon

a top ingredient or that has a high salt

results in a sodium spike. But other

content,” Dr. Colditz says. “The best

condiments impart tons of flavor as well

condiments and toppings will have a

as a surprising number of nutritional

short ingredient list, made up of familiar,

benefits. “While the answer to ‘Ketchup

fresh ingredients.”

or mustard?’ is usually a matter of
preference, there is one clear winner
when it comes to nutrition,” says Dr.
Graham Colditz, associate director
of prevention and control at Siteman
Cancer Center. “While ketchup often
contains high-fructose corn syrup, lots
of sodium and carbohydrates, mustard
is generally made of simple, healthier
ingredients like mustard seed, vinegar,
turmeric and other spices. Just be careful
to watch the sodium content, and watch
for added sugar in flavored mustards,

MUSTARD

like honey Dijon.”

From mild to piquant,
earthy to spicy, mustard
is such an everyday
staple that it’s easy to
overlook as a healthy
food. The entire
mustard plant, from its
greens to its seeds, are
packed with good-foryou nutrients – copper,
phosphorus, selenium
and magnesium are
just a few – as well as
antioxidants, which
can help reduce
inflammation.

Dr. Colditz also suggests using
condiments in unexpected ways. “You
can think about guacamole in foods

“

Before using
any condiment,
be sure to read
the label — opt
out of anything
that lists
sugar as a top
ingredient.

“

HUMMUS

that aren’t Mexican. It can be used as a
condiment quite easily. Pesto fits in that
category as well – you could use it as a
spread on a hamburger bun,” he says.
Guacamole and pesto have other positive
attributes in common too: They are both
full of heart-healthy fats and they are
both easy to make at home.

Dr. Graham Colditz
Washington University
Associate director of prevention
and control at Siteman Cancer
PHOTO PROVIDED BY SITEMAN CANCER CENTER

RELISH
Depending upon where
in the world you are,
relish might be made
with any number of fruits
(like mango chutney),
vegetables (like ajvar made
with red bell peppers)
or even fish. Here in the
U.S., relish most often
comes from pickled
cucumber, a sweet and
tangy accompaniment for
hamburgers and hot dogs.
Relish is low in calories and
fat, but be sure to compare
labels – some brands
contain large amounts of
sodium and sugar.

SALSA
This time of year is tailormade for fresh salsa:
Tomatoes, chiles and bell
peppers are all in season,
and backyard barbecues
seem incomplete without
tortilla chips and dip. But
salsa also provides plenty
of room for creativity.
Fruit salsa made with
strawberries, mangoes
and pineapples makes a
sweet garnish for grilled
chicken breasts, and
tomatillo-jalapeño salsa is
terrific with fish.

Lighter Lemon Garlic Aioli
YIELD | ABOUT 6 SERVINGS (2 TBSP)
½ cup fat-free plain Greek yogurt

2 cloves of garlic, minced

1 Tbsp mayonnaise

¼ tsp onion powder

1 Tbsp olive oil

¼ tsp salt

zest of 1 lemon

½ tsp black pepper

juice of 1 lemon

| Preparation | Combine all ingredients. Refrigerate 30 minutes. Serve with hamburgers, salmon, chicken or other protein. Store in
refrigerator for up to a week.
Nutrition information: (per serving) 51 calories, 4g fat, 173mg sodium, 2g carbohydrate, 0g fiber, 2g protein.

Quick Pickled Cucumbers
YIELD | 8–10 SERVINGS (½ TO 1 MINI CUCUMBER)
1 cup rice wine vinegar

1 Tbsp kosher salt

1 cup water

4–5 mini cucumbers

¾ cup sugar

| Preparation | Place a medium saucepan over high heat. Combine vinegar, water, sugar and salt in a saucepan and bring to a boil.
Remove from heat and add cucumber slices. Stir. Strain cucumbers and press between heavy-duty paper towels, until the towels are
saturated with liquid. Let rest for 10 minutes. Transfer cucumbers to an airtight container and add liquid from saucepan to cover. Use to
garnish meats, grain dishes and more. Store in refrigerator up to a week.
Nutrition Information: (per serving) 94 calories, 0g fat, 541mg sodium, 23g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 1g protein.

Fast Ketchup
YIELD | 10–12 SERVINGS (2 TBSP)
6-oz can tomato paste

1 tsp brown sugar

½ tsp onion powder

½ cup white vinegar

½ cup water

¼ tsp garlic powder

2 Tbsp agave nectar

½ tsp salt

¼ tsp cinnamon

| Preparation | Combine all ingredients in a small saucepan over medium heat. Whisk until blended. Once ketchup starts to boil, reduce
heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes. Stir often. Serve with potatoes, hamburgers, hot dogs and more. Store in refrigerator up to a week.
Nutrition Information: (per serving) 36 calories, 0g fat, 130mg sodium, 8g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 1g protein.

Know Your Risk. Change Your Future.
siteman.wustl.edu/YDR

PHOTO PROVIDED BY GETTY IMAGES

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