Details for BJH SITEMAN MAIN - Ad from 2021-05-05

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GRAPES BRING BENEFITS BY THE BUNCH
SPON SOR ED CON TEN T BY KATHER IN E LEWIS

» LET’S MIX IT UP!

BLACK MUSCAT

FLAME SEEDLESS

CONCORD

The richer in color a fruit or
vegetable is, the healthier
it tends to be, and Black
Muscat grapes are an
excellent example because
they are packed with more
antioxidants than both
green and red grapes.
Black Muscats have an
intoxicating floral aroma,
so they are a natural choice
to use in dessert wines, but
they’re just as enjoyable as
table grapes. Either way,
they pair beautifully with
salty food.

Keep an eye out for red
Flame Seedless grapes —
they’re coming into season
right now. Medium-size
and mildly sweet, they are a
satisfying, low-calorie treat.
These grapes are also fine
sources of resveratrol, the
same antioxidant that gives
red wine its famous health
benefits. Some studies have
suggested that resveratrol
can protect nerve cells from
damage and could even
temper some conditions
that are associated with
aging, such as joint pain and
memory decline.

These big, sweet purple
grapes are hardy enough to
survive brutal New England
winters and hot Missouri
summers. (Missouri
is among the leading
growers of Concords
in the United States.)
Their inky color comes
courtesy of polyphenols,
a micronutrient that may
help reduce inflammation,
blood sugar and the risk of
heart disease.

 DOCTOR'S
Much ink has been spilled on the
benefits that come from drinking a
glass or two of red wine a day, but the
real hero of that story isn’t the wine
itself: It’s resveratrol, a compound
that’s found in grape skin and is
packed with antioxidants that may
help ease inflammation throughout
the body. “Eating red grapes and
other resveratrol-rich foods, like
blueberries, is the healthiest way
of consuming the compound,” says
Dr. Adetunji Toriola, a Washington
University researcher at Siteman
Cancer Center. “While it exists in
red wine, studies suggest alcohol
consumption can increase the
risks of some cancers, negating the
positive effects.” Dr. Toriola says that
resveratrol may help guard against
chronic diseases such as cancer, heart
disease and diabetes.

THOMPSON
SEEDLESS
Popularly known as sultanas
or simply green grapes,
Thompson Seedless are the
most common variety in
the United States. They’re
light and sweet with a
refreshing crunch. Nearly
all raisins are made from
dried Thompson Seedless
grapes, as is U.S.–made
chablis wine. (Capital-C
Chablis has to come from
France.) Grapes and raisins
are both low in calories, but
because raisins are smaller,
it’s easier to overindulge
in them. Still, raisins
and Thompson Seedless
alike are good sources of
potassium and iron.

ORDERS

Antioxidants have a crucially
important job at the cellular level. Dr.
Toriola explains that cells are damaged
by oxidative stress, which happens
when there’s an imbalance between
the formation of free radicals in the
body and the body’s ability to get rid
of them. If free radicals continue to
build up, cell and tissue damage can
occur. However, if oxidative stress is
minimized, so too is the risk of many
health issues and diseases, including
cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative
disorders. The even better news is that
resveratrol is found in grapes of all
colors — the darker the grape, the more
resveratrol it contains.
At just over 80 percent water, grapes
give a boost in hydration, which is
especially important as we head into
the hottest months of the year. They’re

Simple
Chicken Salad
with Grapes
and Pistachios
YIELD: 4
8 oz (½ lb) cooked
chicken breast
1 ½ cups seedless red grapes
¼ cup shelled pistachios
¼ cup plain Greek yogurt
2 Tbsp Dijon mustard

PREPARATION
In a small bowl, mix Greek yogurt
and Dijon mustard. Set aside.
Using two forks, shred chicken
breast and place in a medium
bowl. Slice grapes in half and add
to bowl with chicken. Spoon Greek
yogurt sauce into medium bowl
with chicken mixture. Stir to fully
coat. Give pistachios a rough chop
(if desired) and pour over chicken.
Stir a few times to combine.
Enjoy on a slice of bread or with
your favorite crackers or sliced
veggies — carrots, celery and bell
peppers can all be great scoops!

DR. ADETUNJI TORIOLA
Washington University researcher
at Siteman Cancer Center
PHOTO PROVIDED BY SITEMAN CANCER CENTER

also a light but filling snack and great
additions to salads and smoothies. One
cup of grapes (about 32 seedless grapes)
is just 62 calories but brings about five
percent of the recommended daily
amount of fiber. Jams, jellies and grape
juice can be healthy, but they’re often
loaded with sugar, so be mindful of the
amount listed on the label.
PHOTO PROVIDED BY SITEMAN CANCER CENTER

Know Your Risk. Change Your Future.
siteman.wustl.edu/YDR

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