Details for BJH SITEMAN MAIN - Ad from 2019-11-30

BR A N D AV E. ST U DIOS CON T EN T

in good taste
PRESENTED BY

With their cheerful red
color and sweet-tart
flavor, raspberries are
perfect for perking
up cold December
days. Just one cup of
raspberries brings
more than half of the
recommended daily
amount of vitamin C,
and they are filled with
antioxidants. Thanks
to their low sugar
content, raspberries
are stellar additions to
diabetic diets.

CRANBERRY
Cranberries are one of
only a handful of fruits
native to North America.
Although today we tend
to associate them with
the holiday months, for
thousands of years Native Americans have used
them to create medicine,
dye and even tea from
their leaves. Low in calories and brimming with
vitamins C, A and K, cranberries’ famously tart and
bitter taste mellows after
cooking. Consider making
cranberry jelly or cranberry salsa for a twist
on traditional cranberry
sauce this year.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY SITEMAN CANCER CENTER

SPONSORED CONTENT BY KATHERINE LEWIS

Berries are wonderfully diverse —
if occasionally confusing — fruits.
Botanists are quick to point out
that, technically speaking, bananas
and eggplants are berries while
strawberries and raspberries are
not. Some varieties can thrive even
in freezing temperatures. For others,
only the tropics will do. “Heading into
the cold and often gray winter months,
there’s something special about
adding some color to your meals. It
can brighten the day that little bit
and maybe even lift the spirits,” says
Hank Dart, a health communications
lead who works in prevention and
control for the Siteman Cancer Center
at Washington University School of
Medicine. “And when that color comes
in the form of berries, it can also add
some great flavors and a real health
boost to your winter menus.”
Berries are high in vitamins, minerals
and fiber, as well as nutrients called
phytochemicals. Dart explains that
phytochemicals are found in many
fruits and vegetables (particularly
brightly colored ones) and may help
ease inflammation, reduce tissue
oxidation and inhibit damage to DNA
— which in turn might mitigate the risk
of some cancers.
It’s been estimated that only about 12
percent of the population consumes
the recommended amount of fruit
each day. Dart points to eating berries
as an easy way to get closer to reaching
that goal. “Toss some on your cereal in
the morning. Keep a container in your
bag for midday snacking. And have

a bowl of mixed berries for dessert
after dinner,” he says. Compared to
other options in the produce aisle,
fresh berries can come with a steep
price tag, and they don’t typically have
a long shelf life. Dart says that frozen
berries can be more affordable and
are often just as tasty and nutritious
as fresh ones. “And you can keep a
stash in the freezer for whenever
you might want them. Just be sure to
choose options without added syrup
or sugar,” he says.

“

Heading into
the cold and often
gray winter months,
there’s something
special about adding
some color to
your meals. It can
brighten the day
that little bit and
maybe even lift
the spirits.

“

RASPBERRY

A burst of
berries brings
a kaleidoscope
of benefits

Hank Dart
Health communications lead
in prevention and control for
the Siteman Cancer Center at
Washington University
School of Medicine
PHOTO PROVIDED BY SITEMAN CANCER CENTER

AÇAÍ BERRY
Açaí berries went from
being the relatively
unknown fruit of South
America’s açaí palm
trees to one of the
breakout stars of the

superfood craze — so
much so that they
picked up the nickname
“purple gold.” They
certainly pack a lot into
their one-inch size: Even

though the seed takes
up most of their real
estate, what’s left is a
low-calorie fruit that’s
full of calcium, fiber and
antioxidants.

BLUEBERRY
Though blue and
purple fruits and
vegetables are
somewhat uncommon
in nature, that deep,
inky color — courtesy
of a compound known
as anthocyanin
— is a tipoff to
their significant
health benefits.
Anthocyanins are a hot
topic in research, but
they’re thought to help
thwart inflammation,
microbes, obesity
and diabetes, and
they may even help
in the fight against
some kinds of cancer
and cardiovascular
disease.

STRAWBERRY
The world’s most popular
berry isn’t a berry at all
(scientists would call it
an “aggregate accessory
fruit”), but that hasn’t
slowed its roll. Sweet and
juicy, strawberries pop
up in everything from
breakfast to cocktails
and desserts, as well as
in non-food items like
fragrances and facial
treatments. Although
strawberry slices can
help reduce under-eye
puffiness, their best
work happens inside the
body, where they lower
blood pressure and raise
good cholesterol. Plus,
they contain more antioxidants than almost any
other fruit.

Raspberry Pistachio Scones
YIELDS | ABOUT A DOZEN SCONES

2 cups flour
¼ cup sugar
1 Tbsp baking powder
¼ tsp salt
6 Tbsp butter

1 ¼ cup heavy cream
¾ cup raspberries
¼ cup pistachios
2 Tbsp sugar

| preparation | Preheat oven to 425°F. Whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder and
salt. Cut up butter into tablespoons, and work into the flour mixture with clean hands
until it is in pea-size pieces. Stir in the heavy cream until combined. Fold in raspberries
and pistachios. Drop 11 or 12 scoops of dough onto a parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush
each scone with heavy cream, and sprinkle the remaining sugar on top. Bake until golden,
about 20 to 25 minutes.
NUTRITION INFORMATION:
177 CALORIES, 7G FAT, 188MG SODIUM, 26G CARBOHYDRATE, 1G FIBER, 3G PROTEIN

Categories

You may be interested in

See what people are talking about at The Community Table!