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Medical research roundup

Medical research roundup

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Following is a list of some of the medical research grants awarded to scientists in the area.

Washington University School of Medicine

The scientist • Dr. Timothy Miller, M.D., Clayson Professor of Neurology

The grant • $2.3 million from the National Institutes of Health

The project • The Miller lab has found differences between healthy people and people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in biomolecules known as microRNAs. This project seeks to understand the microRNA differences and the effect of adjusting them to try to develop new diagnostic tests or treatments for ALS.

The scientists • Dr. Rodney Newberry, professor of medicine; and Dr. Phillip Tarr, the Melvin E. Carnahan Professor of Pediatrics and professor of molecular microbiology

The grant • $2.2 million from NIH

The project • To identify, in a mouse model, when and why introduction of food and microbes via the gastrointestinal tract in early life is beneficial in preventing overactive immune responses, which can lead to food allergies, asthma and inflammatory bowel disease in children and young adults.

The scientists • Dr. Daniel Kerschensteiner, associate professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences, neuroscience and biomedical engineering; and Florentina Soto, assistant professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences

The grant • $1.9 million from the NIH

The project • This grant explores the mechanisms by which the diverse types of nerve cells in the retina attain their characteristic morphologies and establish precise connectivity patterns that mediate specific visual functions.

The scientist • Dr. Stuart Friess, associate professor of pediatrics

The grant • $1.7 million from NIH

The project • Supporting work to develop therapeutics for brain protection after severe traumatic brain injury.

The scientists • Barak Cohen, professor of genetics and the Alvin Goldfarb Distinguished Professor of Computational Biology; and Shiming Chen, professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences, and developmental biology

The grant • $1.4 million from the NIH

The project • Experiments designed to understand a class of diseases called retinopathies, in which the cells that compose the human retina degenerate, often leading to blindness. In some cases, retinopathies are caused by genetic mutations that change the way genes get turned on and off in the retina.

St. Louis University School of Medicine

The scientist • Dr. Stephen Braddock, professor of pediatrics

The grant • $120,000 from Illinois Public Health

The study • Pediatric genetic counseling

The scientist • Dr. Marya Strand, associate professor of pediatrics

The grant • $53,978 from the NIH through the University of Virginia

The study • Assisted ventilation for premature infants

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