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Following are some of the medical research grants awarded to area scientists:

Washington University School of Medicine

The scientist • Nupam Mahajan, professor of surgery

The grant • $2.8 million from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health

The project • Examining a small molecule inhibitor that targets prostate tumors that continue to grow despite therapy to lower the amount of testosterone. The focus will be on characterizing how this inhibitor works and could help lead to a clinical trial of the inhibitor in prostate cancer patients with drug-resistant tumors.

The scientists • Dr. Farrokh Dehdashti, professor of radiology; Dr. Kian Lim, assistant professor of medicine; and Yongjian Liu, associate professor of radiology

The grant • $2.8 million from the National Cancer Institute of the NIH

The project • A therapeutic trial targeting a special receptor called CCR2 found in some pancreatic tumors using a new agent developed at Washington University that can provide information about this receptor. The aim is to evaluate whether this imaging agent can help identify patients with pancreatic cancer who may respond to this new therapy.

The scientist • Dr. Jonathan J. Miner, assistant professor of medicine, molecular microbiology, pathology and immunology

The grant • $2.7 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the NIH

The project • Some patients with lupus-like disease have a mutation in a gene called STING, which contributes to immunity against bacteria and viruses. This study will examine mice that have a human mutation in STING to understand how microbes and STING mutations interact to cause immunodeficiency and autoimmune disease.

The scientist • Dr. Megan Baldridge, assistant professor of medicine

The grant • $2 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the NIH

The project • Understanding how intestinal bacteria interact with norovirus, a highly contagious virus that causes gastroenteritis, a critical step to development of oral vaccines and/or probiotic therapies.

The scientist • Yikyung Park, associate professor of surgery

The grant • $1 million from the National Cancer Institute of the NIH

The project • Identifying eating patterns based on when and how often we eat during a day and examining if the patterns are related to obesity and other health indicators in blood such as insulin and lipids.

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