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Dying to smell a 'corpse flower'? Missouri Botanical Garden may provide an opportunity

Dying to smell a 'corpse flower'? Missouri Botanical Garden may provide an opportunity

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Corpse flower

An Amorphophallus titanum, or "corpse flower," blooms at the Missouri Botanical Garden on Sunday, July 9, 2017. Image from the garden's livestream

Smells like a neat opportunity might be in the works at the Missouri Botanical Garden.

Garden officials tweeted Tuesday that Octavia, their "corpse flower" — so named because of the "infamously rotten" smell it produces — is attempting to bloom, and if it happens, it is expected to take place in the next couple of days.

This is the third time that Octavia, an Amorphophallus titanum, has attempted to bloom, garden officials tweeted. Octavia successfully bloomed in 2017, then attempted another bloom in 2019 — growing to a record height of 93 inches. 

"Today, Octavia was measured at 87 inches and is still growing," garden officials tweeted Tuesday.

Unlike during previous bloom attempts, the Missouri Botanical Garden will not offer nighttime viewing hours to accommodate visitors who want to see (and smell) the relatively rare development. The flower is on display in the Climatron during regular garden hours.

A live feed of an Amorphophallus titanum, aka corpse flower, expected to bloom at the Missouri Botanical Garden. This plant is nicknamed 'Octavia' because it was the 8th corpse flower to bloom at the Garden. For more information about the rare bloom of this endangered species, visit the Garden's blog discoverandshare.org. And you can follow the Garden on social media for updates on Octavia's progress.

For those who cannot make it to the Missouri Botanical Garden, a livestream is available for viewing at youtube.com/watch?v=HedLOSNOy3o.

Octavia is the eighth corpse flower to bloom at the Missouri Botanical Garden, garden officials said. The flowers produce a smell that's been likened to decaying flesh, which helps the plants attract pollinators such as flies and beetles.

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