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Pruitt-Igoe comes down

Dynamite brings down some of Pruitt-Igoe in April 1972. Demolition of the 33-building complex had begun two months before. Images of the implosions have become symbolic of failure in the nation's post-World War II housing policies. Photo by Michael J. Baldridge Post-Dispatch

As if more glum news was needed after ranking low on list of best big cities in which to live, 24/7 Wall St. says STL is the 10th most segregated metro area in the U.S.

The analysis states that 39.3 percent of all blacks in the area live in predominantly black neighborhoods, and also has a poverty rate (29.9 percent) about 3.5 times higher than the rate for whites.

The article also points out a notoriously significant event in St. Louis history as one of the causes: the Pruitt-Igoe housing project.

The article called the development of the high-rise public housing structures as "one of the most famously disastrous cases of racially segregated government housing ..."

In the mid-1950s, the federal government constructed several dozen housing towers, some for whites and others for blacks. After racial discrimination was outlawed and black and white residents were allowed to live together in the project, most whites moved out and the structures fell into disrepair.

The buildings were demolished in 1972.

The five most segregated cities, according to the study, are: Detroit; Chicago; Jackson, Miss.; Memphis; and Cleveland.