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Mark it a "must-see," dude.

The word from entertainment publication Variety is that the spin-off of the Coen Brothers classic comedy "The Big Lebowski" will star Jon Hamm.

Jon Hamm

Jon Hamm (Justina Mintz - AMC)

On Monday, Variety reported that the movie, "The Jesus Rolls," follows the story of Jesus Quintana — played by John Turturro, who wrote and is directing the new flick.) 

ED/FILE/BIG LEBOWSKI

File photo from 1998 - John Turturro as bowler Jesus Quintana in the movie, "The Big Lebowski."

Along with STL's No. 1 celeb and Turturro, the cast includes Susan Sarandon, Bobby Cannavale, Audrey Tatou and Pete Davidson of "Saturday Night Live."

In a thumbnail synopsis, Variety states the movie "follows a trio of misfits ... (who) make enemies with a gun-toting hairdresser."

"The Big Lebowski" was released in 1998 and starred Jeff Bridges, John Goodman and Steve Buscemi. Turturro starred in, and stole, a couple of scenes playing a foul-mouthed bowler/sex offender.

A cult classic turns 20

It's too easy to spill ink waxing about the ways in which Coen brothers' "The Big Lebowski" has embedded itself in our culture.

The film, released 20 years ago this week starring Jeff Bridges and Affton native John Goodman, is no average cult flick showing at midnight at your local art house theater.

Though the movie was not a huge box-office success, it has since spawned a pseudo-religion, Dudeism, with more than 450,000 "ordained priests;" annual festivals around the country where thousands of costume-clad fans gather to celebrate the film and all its obscure moments; books and academic treatments; White Russian competitions, and legions of fans so fervent that they inspired a film of their own, the documentary, "The Achievers."

But there is a small group of people who were not impressed with the film, at least when it came out: Many critics were quick to dismiss it as self-indulgent and chaotic. (One who wasn't quick to dismiss it? The Post-Dispatch's Joe Holleman, who gave it four out of four stars when the movie was first released.)

We took a look at some of the more negative reviews of the film written after its release on March 6, 1998, and reached out with a simple query for the critics who penned them: Would you review "The Big Lebowski" similarly now? Or has your opinion of the movie changed with the benefit of two decades' time?

A story in Deadline noted that Joel and Ethan Coen were not involved in the sequel, but "gave Turturro their blessing to further explore the character."


The film turned 20 in 2018:

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