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CLAYTON — An inmate who had been held in the St. Louis County Jail for eight days died Tuesday less than an hour after being taken to a state prison, officials said.

Daniel Stout was transported from the jail in a St. Louis County vehicle and arrived at Eastern Reception, Diagnostic & Correctional Center in Bonne Terre about 9:35 a.m., said Karen Pojmann, a spokeswoman for the Missouri Department of Corrections. Emergency crews responded at 10:09 a.m. for a medical emergency. An ambulance arrived, but Stout was already dead.

Pojmann said Stout was 29; court records said he was 31.

No further details were released about the circumstances leading to his death. Pojmann said an autopsy had been scheduled. The case is under investigation by authorities in St. Francois County and the corrections department.

St. Louis County authorities said Stout had been in custody since June 3. Pojmann said he had recently been arrested on a parole violation and revocation. In September 2017, he was sentenced in St. Louis County Circuit Court to four years in prison after pleading guilty in two drug possession cases. It was not immediately clear how much time he served before his parole.

In a letter to the County Council for its regular meeting on Tuesday, County Executive Sam Page said his staff had talked to Stout’s family and offered condolences. He said he had ordered the county’s justice services and public health departments to investigate his time in custody. He said the state of Missouri is also investigating.

“We are also in the process of a comprehensive review of Public Health and Justice Services personnel, policies, procedures and performance to ensure the County is doing everything it can do to prevent future deaths,” he wrote. “We have already made several key changes and will continue to do so as we learn more about this unfortunate event.”

A series of three deaths in the jail earlier this year resulted in criminal investigations, a council inquiry, a lawsuit and a change of leadership. Prosecuting Attorney Wesley Bell said May 23 that investigations by police and prosecutors identified systemic breakdowns in the jail that he found “troubling.

Lapses included nurses who failed to perform basic functions to treat patients or barely knew jail procedures, a guard who did not conduct a proper headcount and the availability of drugs in the jail. But Bell said the evidence did not support a criminal charge.

Jeremy Kohler is an investigative reporter for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.