Skip to main content
You are the owner of this article.
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
St. Louis attorney who died by suicide was 'sick and dying,' law firm says

St. Louis attorney who died by suicide was 'sick and dying,' law firm says

{{featured_button_text}}
Ed Brown

Charles "Ed" Brown.

ST. LOUIS — A co-worker of well-known attorney Charles “Ed” Brown explained Wednesday that Brown was facing a serious health condition that likely led him to jump to his death this week from an 11th floor balcony.

“Ed had made a request that if anyone asks why he committed suicide, the answer is he was sick and dying (not COVID-19 related),” according to David Shulman, speaking on behalf of the Brown & Brown law firm.

No additional information was provided.

St. Louis police Officer Michelle Woodling said the death was classified as a suicide and that detectives were still investigating the case. Therefore, she said, police will not comment on whether Brown left a note or message.

Shulman also said that the family wanted its privacy and was not available for comment. Shulman works for the Brown & Brown law firm, which Brown founded with his brother Dan Brown in 1993.

St. Louis police Sgt. Keith Barrett said earlier that Brown, 61, jumped about 4:30 p.m. Monday from the 11th floor balcony and landed on a roof that is accessible from the third floor of the building at One Memorial Drive.

The building is the Gateway Tower, adjacent to Interstate 44 and Gateway Arch National Park. The Brown & Brown law firm’s St. Louis office is on the 11th floor of the building. Ed Brown, known for wearing an eye patch, was featured in television ads and billboards in the region.

Woodling said homicide detectives went to the scene, however, “since there were no suspicious circumstances noted at this time, the investigation is being handled by district detectives.”


Editor’s note: Evidence shows that lives can be saved with mental health support. If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts, help is just a moment away. Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255), text 741741 or visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org for free, confidential support 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Blues News

Breaking News

Cardinals News

Daily 6

National Breaking News

Sports