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Updated at 4:50 p.m. Saturday with additional statement from national fraternity officials.

A fraternity at the University of Missouri-Columbia at the center of a racial incident last month is under investigation for a slew of violations, and has been put on notice about an allegation that new members were instructed to drug women before sexually assaulting them, according to documents obtained through a records request.

Mizzou’s chapter of Delta Upsilon is currently suspended by the campus and its national organization. The chapter was put on probation in mid-September for alcohol violations. Two weeks later, police were summoned to the fraternity house for a racial incident. The fraternity was suspended Sept. 28, the day after that incident.

A Post-Dispatch request for disciplinary records regarding the fraternity yielded 79 pages of documents outlining numerous alcohol violations, along with a letter from Mizzou Title IX Administrator Ellen Eardley outlining details of an allegation made against the fraternity.

Eardley said her office received a report that “on or about Monday, August 22, 2016, active members of Delta Upsilon fraternity allegedly provided each new member with three pills and instructed them to drug women for the purpose of incapacitating them prior to engaging in sexual activity. It has been alleged that new members are required to engage in such conduct in order to complete the initiation process.”

Three weeks later, police responded to at least four incidents in one night, two of which involved party-goers who drank too much, according to Mizzou police officer Steve Verble. City police and campus police each handled one of the alcohol calls.

All fraternity and sorority houses are in Columbia Police Department jurisdiction, but calls for service are reported to campus police.

In a Sept. 10 email to Janna Basler, assistant director of Mizzou’s Greek Life, about those incidents, Verble wrote that Delta Upsilon “seems to have returned in full force as the usual problem it is.”

In her response, Basler agreed that “there are definitely some issues occurring” and that this was more than an isolated incident.

The newspaper’s records request spanned all of the 2015-16 school year and the first few months of the current year.

A report filed last fall by the Department of Residential Life outlines a hazing incident in which a man who identified himself as a pledge member of Delta Upsilon said members forced the initiates to fight one another. He had a battered hand when leaders at his dormitory found him. When they asked if he was drunk, he said, “I don’t even know. They gave us so much.”

An undated document that appears to be from the current semester outlines a “recalibration plan” for the Mizzou DU chapter, listing a string of personal and group development seminars in which members apparently participated.

Mizzou officials refused to comment on whether this effort was university led, and officials with Delta Upsilon’s national chapter couldn’t be reached for comment Friday.

Delta Upsilon executive director Justin Kirk emailed a Post-Dispatch reporter on Oct. 5 saying he was aware of the newspaper’s records request and offering some information about recent changes in the Mizzou chapter.

“Because of the chapter’s historically strong track record and alumni support, we have worked tirelessly and collaboratively with the university to investigate recent incidents and support the sanctions it has brought forward,” Kirk said wrote.

In 2014, the chapter removed 90 of its 132 members. Sometime after that, the fraternity employed a graduate student to live in the house for programming and guidance. They also hired an off-duty police officer to “walk the chapter facility during high-risk times.”

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“Delta Upsilon International Fraternity continues to work closely with the University of Missouri to investigate recent issues, some of which we have just learned of within the last few days,” Kirk said in the email. “We will not condone or tolerate the type of behavior alleged in these incidents, and the chapter remains on a temporary suspension as our investigation continues.”

On Friday, the fraternity released another statement from Kirk that said the alleged incidents in the university’s documents were “deeply concerning” and that the fraternity remained under suspension while the investigation continued.

Kirk added that “some of the alleged incidents, including the distribution of predatory drugs, were not pursued further by the police or the university. There have not been reports of sexual assault against the chapter.”

Kirk sent a follow-up statement Saturday saying that the allegations were "found to be unsubstantiated" by Mizzou. Another Delta Upsilon official said Mizzou had informed the fraternity via "verbal confirmation." A spokesperson from Mizzou said he couldn't comment on the allegations.

Mizzou spokeswoman Mary Jo Banken confirmed that the fraternity was under investigation by the Student Conduct Office and the university’s Office of Civil Rights and Title IX.

When asked how Mizzou monitored the fraternity during its suspension, Banken said in a statement: “If these allegations are serious, the national governing boards of the fraternities and sororities will be notified as well as their alumni executive boards. Members of these two organizations may take additional reactive measures against accused members or of the fraternity or sorority.”


Editor's note: This story has been corrected to reflect that both Columbia police and campus police at the University of Missouri-Columbia each responded to two incidents connected to the Delta Upsilon house early on Sept. 10. City and campus police each handled one alcohol-related call.