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Illinois to lose seat in Congress after 2020 census population drop. Missouri holds steady

Illinois to lose seat in Congress after 2020 census population drop. Missouri holds steady

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The Census Results: What is Apportionment?

ST. LOUIS — Missouri’s population grew over the past decade, but not enough to win the state another seat in U.S. Congress, according to 2020 census figures released Monday. In contrast, Illinois grew so little it will lose a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

The census reported 6.2 million Missouri residents, about 170,000 more than in 2010. Illinois added roughly 8,000, keeping the population at 12.8 million.

St. Louis Mayor Tishaura O. Jones said she was relieved to hear Missouri’s representation will remain the same.

“I actually thought we would lose a seat,” Jones said on Monday. “I thought we would lose population and be in a position to lose a seat again like we did 10 years ago.”

St. Louis County Executive Sam Page also weighed in on the census figures late Monday: “Representation in Washington is critical for the state and St. Louis County. We will continue focusing on growing our region to ensure our voice remains strong in D.C.”

The census release was the first step in the Congressional reapportionment process. It will also soon trigger a refiguring of congressional districts in each state. Missouri lawmakers have already formed a special redistricting committee. That committee now awaits census block-level data, expected at the end of September, said Rep. Dan Shaul, chair of the House Elections Committee and of the special committee. That is when committee members will put pen to paper to redraw districts, he said.

“We don’t know how that 6.1 million is spread throughout Missouri,” said Shaul, R-Imperial.

As a whole, the U.S. population rose 7.4% over the decade to more than 331 million residents, far slower than in the prior decade, and the second-slowest rate between censuses in U.S. history.

Population, and congressional representation, continued to shift south and west, the new data show. Six states — Texas, Colorado, Florida, Montana, North Carolina and Oregon — gained seats. Seven states lost seats: California, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Illinois.

The Midwest — defined by the bureau as North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio — grew 3.1%, compared to a decade prior.

Charlie Dalton, executive director of the Missouri GOP, said he believes the population shifts show voters’ dissonance with the results of Democratic policies.

“Places like Missouri and Texas are much lower in taxes, and are much more business-friendly,” Dalton said.

Michael Butler, chairman of the Missouri Democrats, scoffed at Dalton.

“That’s preposterous,” Butler said. “Liberal states have some of the largest populations in the country, still.”

The Constitution requires a census every 10 years to count every single person living in the U.S. That count then helps figure the number of Congressional seats per state in the U.S. House of Representatives.

There are 435 seats in the U.S. House. Every state must have at least one representative. After the first 50 seats, the formula is used to determine how many additional representatives each state gets.

Missouri’s eight congressional districts are also redrawn every decade, to reflect changes within the state. The Missouri House began planning for the work more than a year ago by renovating space on the fifth floor of the Capitol for a demographer and others who are working on the process.

The House Special Committee on Redistricting began meeting in March. While the delay in the release of the federal numbers has caused heartburn in states whose laws impose strict deadlines for redistricting, there is no such deadline in Missouri.

Shaul, the committee chair, said the committee likely will meet into the fall months.

Candidates wanting to run for the reconfigured districts have until February to begin filing.

Kurt Erickson of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

Illinois loses one congressional seat; Missouri stays the same

Missouri, which saw population growth of about 2.8% in the past decade, kept its eight congressional seats. Illinois, which saw a slight decline in population, lost a seat. Both Midwest states have seen a steady decline in congressional representation as the nation’s population moved south and west. Source: U.S. Census 

2020 2010 2000 1990 1980 1970 1960 1950 1940 1930 1920 1910
MISSOURI
Number of Seats 8 8 9 9 9 10 10 11 13 13 16 16
Change in Seats 0 -1 0 0 -1 0 -1 -2 0 -3 0 0
Average Population Per Seat 770,035 751,435 622,918 570,867 546,383 471,803 431,981 359,514 291,128 279,162 212,753 205,833
ILLINOIS
Number of Seats 17 18 19 20 22 24 24 25 26 27 27 27
Change in Seats -1 -1 -1 -2 -2 0 -1 -1 -1 0 0 2
Average Population Per Seat 754,279 714,688 654,686 573,334 519,021 466,013 420,048 348,487 303,740 282,607 240,196 208,837

Shifting population saw Utah with biggest percentage gain, West Virginia with biggest decline

Illinois’ population slid by 0.1% while Missouri’s rose by 2.8%. Source: U.S. Census

Area 2020 Census Resident Population 2010 Census Resident Population Numeric Change Percent Change State Rank Based on 2020 Census Resident Population State Rank Based on 2010 Census Resident Population State Rank Based on Numeric Change State Rank Based on Percent Change
Alabama 5,024,279 4,779,736 244,543 5.10 24 23 24 27
Alaska 733,391 710,231 23,160 3.30 48 47 45 36
Arizona 7,151,502 6,392,017 759,485 11.90 14 16 8 9
Arkansas 3,011,524 2,915,918 95,606 3.30 33 32 34 35
California 39,538,223 37,253,956 2,284,267 6.10 1 1 3 24
Colorado 5,773,714 5,029,196 744,518 14.80 21 22 9 6
Connecticut 3,605,944 3,574,097 31,847 0.90 29 29 44 47
Delaware 989,948 897,934 92,014 10.20 45 45 37 13
District of Columbia 689,545 601,723 87,822 14.60 X X X X
Florida 21,538,187 18,801,310 2,736,877 14.60 3 4 2 8
Georgia 10,711,908 9,687,653 1,024,255 10.60 8 9 4 12
Hawaii 1,455,271 1,360,301 94,970 7.00 40 40 35 23
Idaho 1,839,106 1,567,582 271,524 17.30 38 39 22 2
Illinois 12,812,508 12,830,632 -18,124 -0.10 6 5 49 48
Indiana 6,785,528 6,483,802 301,726 4.70 17 15 20 29
Iowa 3,190,369 3,046,355 144,014 4.70 31 30 30 28
Kansas 2,937,880 2,853,118 84,762 3.00 35 33 38 37
Kentucky 4,505,836 4,339,367 166,469 3.80 26 26 28 33
Louisiana 4,657,757 4,533,372 124,385 2.70 25 25 32 41
Maine 1,362,359 1,328,361 33,998 2.60 42 41 43 42
Maryland 6,177,224 5,773,552 403,672 7.00 18 19 18 22
Massachusetts 7,029,917 6,547,629 482,288 7.40 15 14 15 21
Michigan 10,077,331 9,883,640 193,691 2.00 10 8 27 46
Minnesota 5,706,494 5,303,925 402,569 7.60 22 21 19 19
Mississippi 2,961,279 2,967,297 -6,018 -0.20 34 31 48 49
Missouri 6,154,913 5,988,927 165,986 2.80 19 18 29 39
Montana 1,084,225 989,415 94,810 9.60 44 44 36 14
Nebraska 1,961,504 1,826,341 135,163 7.40 37 38 31 20
Nevada 3,104,614 2,700,551 404,063 15.00 32 35 17 5
New Hampshire 1,377,529 1,316,470 61,059 4.60 41 42 40 30
New Jersey 9,288,994 8,791,894 497,100 5.70 11 11 13 25
New Mexico 2,117,522 2,059,179 58,343 2.80 36 36 41 38
New York 20,201,249 19,378,102 823,147 4.20 4 3 7 32
North Carolina 10,439,388 9,535,483 903,905 9.50 9 10 6 15
North Dakota 779,094 672,591 106,503 15.80 47 48 33 4
Ohio 11,799,448 11,536,504 262,944 2.30 7 7 23 45
Oklahoma 3,959,353 3,751,351 208,002 5.50 28 28 25 26
Oregon 4,237,256 3,831,074 406,182 10.60 27 27 16 11
Pennsylvania 13,002,700 12,702,379 300,321 2.40 5 6 21 43
Rhode Island 1,097,379 1,052,567 44,812 4.30 43 43 42 31
South Carolina 5,118,425 4,625,364 493,061 10.70 23 24 14 10
South Dakota 886,667 814,180 72,487 8.90 46 46 39 16
Tennessee 6,910,840 6,346,105 564,735 8.90 16 17 11 17
Texas 29,145,505 25,145,561 3,999,944 15.90 2 2 1 3
Utah 3,271,616 2,763,885 507,731 18.40 30 34 12 1
Vermont 643,077 625,741 17,336 2.80 49 49 46 40
Virginia 8,631,393 8,001,024 630,369 7.90 12 12 10 18
Washington 7,705,281 6,724,540 980,741 14.60 13 13 5 7
West Virginia 1,793,716 1,852,994 -59,278 -3.20 39 37 50 50
Wisconsin 5,893,718 5,686,986 206,732 3.60 20 20 26 34
Wyoming 576,851 563,626 13,225 2.30 50 50 47 44
UNITED STATES 331,449,281 308,745,538 22,703,743 7.40 X X X X

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