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Election 2018 Senate Missouri Hawley

FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2018 file photo, Republican Missouri U.S. Senate candidate Josh Hawley talks to the media after a debate against incumbent Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill in Kansas City, Mo. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

JEFFERSON CITY • A Democrat running for Missouri attorney general says his process server personally served Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., on Friday with a subpoena during the Conservative Political Action Conference.

The Cole County Circuit Court issued a subpoena last month at Elad Gross’ request. Though one was delivered to Hawley’s Senate office, a subpoena had not been delivered to Hawley personally.

Hawley’s attorneys listed the failure to serve Hawley personally as one reason a Cole County judge should quash the subpoena. Gross told the Post-Dispatch that Hawley was handed a subpoena by a process server after Hawley delivered a speech at CPAC in Washington on Friday.

“We got him,” Gross said on Twitter. “After more than two weeks of evading service, Senator Josh Hawley was personally served with the subpoena at CPAC.”

“This is another political stunt by a political candidate,” Hawley spokeswoman Kelli Ford said in an email. “The reality is that Mr. Gross has been evading a court date to discuss the matter.”

Court records show that a hearing in the case was scheduled for Friday but was recently rescheduled for March 15. Gross denied he was evading a hearing.

The subpoena stems from an open records dispute Gross has with the state. He is seeking a cache of documents from Gov. Mike Parson’s office related to then-Gov. Eric Greitens, but the governor’s office won’t turn the documents over unless Gross signs a $3,600 check.

Gross filed a complaint with Hawley’s attorney general’s office last fall, but the attorney general’s office sided with Parson’s administration.

Gross wants Hawley to bring to his deposition “any and all communications, recordings, calendars, notes, and/or other documents involving you, campaign donors, state employees, consultants, and/or others” that relate to the application of the Sunshine Law in regard to Gross’ request.

Ford has also said that Hawley personally isn’t a party to Gross’ lawsuit.

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Jack Suntrup covers state government and politics for the Post-Dispatch.