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Midterm election voting

People wait in line to vote at McKnight Crossings Church of Christ in St. Louis on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018. Photo by Johanna Huckeba, jhuckeba@post-dispatch.com.

Updated 12:00 a.m. With almost all votes counted, Missouri appears to have overwhelmingly approved a plan to gradually raise the state's current $7.85 minimum wage.

Proposition B will bump the minimum rate to $8.60 an hour starting Jan. 1, and increase it every year by 85 cents until reaching $12 in 2023.

With 95 percent of precincts reporting, the proposition won 62 percent of the vote. 

St. Louis attempted to raise its own minimum wage in 2015, but the ordinance was challenged in court. When it finally became law, the victory was short-lived as the Missouri Legislature passed an override. In the months that followed, proponents turned to a ballot initiative to hike the wage statewide. 

Also appearing to win big as the final results trickled in is Amendment 1, better known as "Clean Missouri." The proposal includes a ban on most lobbyist gifts to lawmakers, a reduction of campaign contribution limits and would extend the application of open records laws to state lawmakers.

Its most controversial provision would change Missouri’s system for drawing state legislative districts with a model designed to have the number of seats won by each party more closely reflect its statewide vote.

Still, the measure won approval from more than 60 percent of voters, according to unofficial results from the Missouri Secretary of State's office. 


Updated 11:35 p.m. The Associated Press has called victories for both Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway and Amendment 2, one of three medical marijuana ballot initiatives. 

The measure, backed by New Approach Missouri, asked voters for approval to impose a 4 percent tax on retail marijuana sales, which would go toward veterans’ health care. The state estimates the proposal would generate $18 million in fees and sales tax each year.

As of 11:30 p.m., Galloway led her Republican challenger, Saundra McDowell, by five points: 50 percent, to 45 percent for McDowell. 

Amendment 2 won more than 65 percent of the vote. Two other medical marijuana initiatives on the ballot Tuesday lost by wide margins. 

Missourians also defeated Proposition D, a measure to raise the gas tax for infrastructure improvements. The measure's backers conceded, but said "seeking new funding for Missouri’s proven critical infrastructure needs was still the right thing to do."


Updated 11:15 p.m. Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway has now taken a razor-thin lead in her race to remain Missouri's top fiscal watchdog. 

With 87 percent of precincts reporting, Galloway has 48 percent of the vote to 47 percent for Saundra McDowell, her Republican opponent. 

McDowell has led by a fairly large margin for most of the night, but the Associated Press has now called the race for Galloway. 


Updated 11 p.m. Republican Ann Wagner has won re-election to the U.S. House, defeating Democrat Cort VanOstran in Missouri's 2nd congressional district.

Final numbers are not in, but VanOstran has conceded. As of 11 p.m., Wagner held a four point lead. 


Updated 10:50 p.m. Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway has tightened Republican Saundra McDowell's lead, but with 66 percent of precincts reporting, she's still behind. 

McDowell has 49 percent of the vote so far, to Galloway's 45 percent. 


 Updated 10:45 p.m. With roughly half of all precincts reporting, incumbent U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner holds a five point lead over her Democratic opponent in the 2nd District, with 52 percent of the votes to Cort VanOstran's 47 percent. 


Updated 10:20 p.m. Three of the most-watched proposals on the Missouri ballot Tuesday took an early lead and appear to be cruising to victory. 

With half of the state's precincts reporting, Amendment 1, the "Clean Missouri" ethics overhaul, won nearly 60 percent of the vote, according to unofficial results from the Missouri Secretary of State's office. 

One of three medical marijuana initiatives won big on Tuesday night. Amendment 2 is headed for passage with 61 percent of voters approving it so far. The other two medical marijuana proposals are losing by wide margins. 

It's also unlikely Missouri will see a hike in its gas tax, with a measure pushed to fix up the state's roads and bridges losing big, 44 percent to 56 percent. 

It appears Missouri's minimum wage will increase statewide, with Proposition B holding a 16 point lead. That proposal will gradually raise the wage to $12 an hour by 2023. 

Amendment 4, which would change prerequisites for bingo volunteers, holds a very narrow lead, 51 to 49 percent. 


Updated 10:00 p.m. U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner now holds a three point lead over Democratic challenger Cort VanOstran. 

Amendment 1, the "Clean Missouri" measure, has won 59 percent of the vote with more than 40 percent of precincts reporting. Proposition B to raise the minimum wage and Amendment 2 for medical marijuana hold similarly large leads. The other two marijuana proposals are losing handily, as is a measure to raise Missouri's gas tax. 


Updated 9:45 p.m. With roughly 30 percent of precincts reporting, several of Missouri's high profile ballot initiatives have established early leads. 

The “Clean Missouri” initiative, an overhaul of state ethics laws, has won approval of 57 percent of voters, to 43 percent, according to unofficial results from the Missouri Secretary of State's office. 

Proposition B to raise Missouri’s minimum wage has sizable early lead, with 55 percent in favor.

One of three medical marijuana initiatives is winning big so far, with nearly 60 percent in favor. The other two measures, Proposition C and Amendment 3, are trailing, with only 39 percent and 30 percent, respectively.

A plan to increase the state's gasoline tax for road work and the Missouri Highway Patrol was losing in early returns Tuesday night. With nearly a third of the vote counted statewide, the measure - Proposition D - was losing by a 57 percent to 43 percent.

Missouri State Auditor Nicole Galloway is trailing Republican challenger Saundra McDowell by about nine points, with about 34 percent of precincts reporting.

The race between Republican U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner and Democrat Cort VanOstran is neck-and-neck so far, with VanOstran winning 50 percent of the vote to Wagner’s 48.5 percent, with about 8 percent of precincts reporting.


Updated 9:10 p.m.: Missouri Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft's office was delaying posting any statewide vote tabulations Tuesday night until people in long lines at polling places in St. Louis County and Jackson County in the Kansas City area had finished voting.

Maura Browning, a spokeswoman for Ashcroft, said the office was holding off posting any partial results so as not to influence people still waiting in line to vote. State law allows people in line at the official 7 p.m. closing time to vote.

Ashcroft's office tweeted that shortly after that officials estimated the final vote in Missouri would be cast after 9:30 p.m. 

"Please be patient. Every vote matters," the tweet read. 

Eric Fey, Democratic director of elections for St. Louis County, said about 200 people were still waiting in line at 7 p.m. at the polling place at the Washington University Field House that serves voters who live on campus. He said it was expected that all waiting there would have voted by about 8:30 p.m. He said polling places at the Maplewood and Black Jack city halls and Pattonville Heights Middle School had smaller lines at 7 p.m.


ST. LOUIS • For many, the wait to cast a ballot on Tuesday was a long one. But the polls have now closed and Missouri voters will soon know the fate of several high profile ballot issues, their new state auditor and the results of a nationally watched suburban St. Louis congressional race. 

This story will be updated as results come in. 

U.S. Representative, 2nd District

A Missouri congressional district that’s long been solidly Republican has nonetheless drawn national attention heading into this Tuesday’s election, as political newcomer Cort VanOstran will attempt to unseat incumbent U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner in her bid for a fourth term.

It'll be an uphill battle for the Democrat, as Wagner has a deep political resume and has raised significantly more money. But the race is one of several that have been largely viewed as a referendum on President Donald Trump, who won the district in 2016 by a wide margin.  

Missouri State Auditor

Missouri State Auditor Nicole Galloway, the lone Democrat in Missouri holding statewide office, will attempt to ward off a challenge from Republican Saundra McDowell, attorney who formerly worked for the Missouri Secretary of State’s office.

Missouri Constitutional Amendment 1

It includes a ban on most lobbyist gifts to lawmakers, a reduction of campaign contribution limits and would extend the application of open records laws to state lawmakers. 

Its most controversial provision would change Missouri’s system for drawing state legislative districts with a model designed to have the number of seats won by each party more closely reflect its statewide vote.

Missouri Constitutional Amendment 4

This measure would amend the Missouri Constitution to change the restriction on the experience required for workers to run bingo games.

Missouri Proposition B

The state initiative known as Proposition B would gradually raise Missouri’s minimum wage to $12 an hour. It's $7.85 an hour now. 

That change wouldn't happen overnight if it wins approval on Tuesday: Proposition B would bump the minimum rate to $8.60 an hour starting Jan. 1, and increase it every year by 85 cents until reaching $12 in 2023.

Missouri Proposition D

State transportation officials and other supporters – including Missouri Gov. Mike Parson – say Proposition D is an essential first step toward meeting $825 million a year in unmet state road and bridge needs.

Under the proposition, put on the ballot by the Legislature, the current 17-cents-a-gallon state tax would increase 2.5 cents each year starting next July until it hits 27 cents in mid-2022.

Medical marijuana initiatives

Voters weighed in on three medical marijuana ballot initiatives on Tuesday. Missouri would be the 31st state to legalize marijuana for medicinal use if any of the three pass.

Amendment 2 from New Approach Missouri asks voters for approval to impose a 4 percent tax on retail marijuana sales, which would go toward veterans’ health care. The state estimates the proposal would generate $18 million in fees and sales tax each year.

Amendment 3, funded by Springfield physician Ben Bradshaw, would impose a 15 percent tax on medical pot sales to finance a state institute to conduct research on cancer and other diseases.

Proposition C, sponsored by Missourians for Patient Care, would change state statutes to make marijuana legal for medical use and impose a 2 percent retail tax on medical marijuana, channeling revenue to early childhood education, veterans care, public safety and drug treatment.

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