Subscribe for 99¢
Trump at the White House

President Donald Trump waves as he walks toward the Oval Office on May 23 after a ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery.

The Democratic Party, once known as the “party of the people,” has ceased to exist as I once knew it. For 65-plus years, I supported it and voted for it as did my father before me. In 2016, I voted for Republican Donald Trump.

The party of the people has forgotten the people who voted for Democratic candidates, supported the platform and had faith that those elected had our best interests at heart. That Democratic Party is gone, replaced by politicians who promote personal agendas, inferior policies and demonstrate an inability to solve the many problems the nation faces.

Eight years of stagnant policies under President Barack Obama just could not continue under fellow Democrat Hillary Clinton. Change was needed — and real change, not the status quo. So after having voted for every Democratic candidate for president since Hubert Humphrey, I decided to vote for Trump.

Frustration, disappointment, arrogance and a loss of hope among people like me are what got Trump elected. Democratic Party leaders came to the false conclusion that they no longer needed to appease the vast middle of the road — folks who work every day and pay the bills.

Those leaders took our votes for granted. They also forgot or never realized that there are 1.8 million combat veterans in this country, many of whom who were disappointed and afraid of the prospect that continued appeasement of known U.S. enemies would make their sorrow and sacrifices seem worthless.

I remember when the Democratic Party learned from its mistakes, and tried to never repeat them. That’s no longer true with this new Democratic/Socialist Party. They learned nothing from the losses in 2016 and continue to blindly follow an agenda that would leave the country with mounting problems and no solutions.

No one has the ability to predict the future, but common sense is a wonderful guide to what may happen in 2020. American voters expect results from the people they elected to represent them. People are seeing results from Trump and the Republicans, but not from the Democrat-led House of Representatives.

I cannot recall any nation that achieved success under a socialist government. The ideas of the left wingers now vying to control the Democratic Party sound good and look good on paper but are not practical — now nor ever. A socialist government believes and acts as if average voters are idiots, not smart enough to make even the smallest decisions on their own. So the government will make those decisions for us.

When has a socialist government ever worked like that without becoming a dictator state? It hasn’t, because people cherish their independence and have the will to make their own decisions, as we have in the U.S. for 243 years. We did it as a republic, deciding who we wanted as leaders. And if those leaders fail us, we elect new ones.

The people make the decisions, not the government, not a political party. I recall when the government tried to force on us something we didn’t want — Prohibition. Are people frustrated? Yes, we are, but changing to a form of government radically different from the one our forefathers founded will not solve our frustrations. You don’t fix things that aren’t broken because, at one time or another, you didn’t get what you wanted.

There are reasons why the Founding Fathers created the Electoral College and crafted our Constitution, Bill of Rights and three co-equal branches of government. They have seen this country through countless recessions, depressions, a dozen small wars, two world wars and the Civil War, which cost this nation half a million citizens. This form of government saw us through impeachments, a president’s resignation, assassination attempts on presidents — four of them successful — and took us back from the brink of nuclear war.

Yet we’re still here. Is our system of government broken? I don’t think so.

Phillip Reagan is a retired police officer who lives in Wentzville.