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The "Cardinal way" is an expression that is getting tossed around a lot these days, a label that seems almost ostentatious.

But those who use it insist it has legs. The Cardinal way isn't a brag, it's a mantra, a baseball theology, a direction. During a recent World Series news conference, Cardinals general manager John Mozeliak did his best to explain.

"I think when you think about the St. Louis Cardinals, there's obviously just a steep history of success," Mozeliak said. "I think when players decide they want to play here or look to play in St. Louis, there's certain expectations that a player wants to see done.

"Our goal as a front office, as coaches and a manager, we're just trying to make sure that the atmosphere is a winning atmosphere and one that's catering to what they believe and what they expect from this organization.

"And so when you think about building a business, you want that culture to represent success, and when we look at things and you hear people say, 'Cardinal way' it's about tradition, it's about respect, and it's about doing things right. That's what we try to really impart onto our players."

After the Cardinals defeated the Rangers in Game 7 of the World Series at Busch Stadium on Friday night, after they survived two match points in Game 6 and won in 11 innings, after they came from 10 1/2 games back in mid-August to win a championship no one saw coming, the statement is a little easier to comprehend.

The Cardinal way was pioneered by Branch Rickey, Rogers Hornsby and Frankie Frisch. It's been adopted by Gas House Gangs, Coopers and Deans, "Country" and "Cha-Cha." It is muscular like Joe Medwick, imposing like Bob Gibson, dynamic like Lou Brock and acrobatic like Ozzie Smith.

It has had oracles like George Kissell and Red Schoendienst, keepers like Billy Southworth and Whitey Herzog, deities like Stan Musial and Albert Pujols.

The Cardinal way covers 11 World Series championships and 24 playoff appearances, more ground than any other franchise in the National League covers. During Tony La Russa's 16-year tenure, the Cardinal way has averaged 88 wins and advanced to nine postseasons. In the last eight years, it has included three World Series appearances and two championships. The only franchise with a more illustrious trail is the New York Yankees. The Pinstripe way has led to 27 World Series championships, 47 pennants and 50 playoff appearances. The Pinstripe way has lots to brag about.

The Cardinal way boasts a fraternity of red jackets and Hall of Fame names, congregating at home plate on special occasions, closing ranks around "Baseball's Perfect Knight." The Cardinal way is a code La Russa embraced when he came to St. Louis in 1996. He experienced it as a young player, he espouses it as a Cooperstown-bound skipper. He believes in it.

"There is something to the history and the tradition of the Cardinals that as soon as you sign on you feel," La Russa said. "And those guys remind you. During my first year, they came into spring training and they're there, and you know they're pulling like hell for that year's edition to add something.

"I think it helps year in and year out. I think our guys feel it and they want to live up to it as best they can. So that's what it is here."

During this season, through this incredible journey, players have witnessed firsthand how far you might go by following the Cardinal way.

"It's just about us as an organization," La Russa said, explaining his team's improbable finish. "I mean, this one is just different. It was really hard and it was different. As I said a couple days ago, it's like your favorite dog, favorite cat. They're just different. They're still your favorites.

"But in the end, I mean, as a staff, a lot of us have been together a long time, and we have always gotten turned on by guys — veterans who have a chance to win a world championship. So it's really special for some of those guys that paid a lot of dues … We share that with even the young guys, this may be the last time you play in it, you don't have any assurances.

"You know, that turns our staff on and has for years. It's part of what we try to talk to the players about, and this year it worked. I'm really happy for all the organization, but I'm especially happy for the first-timers."

For players such as Lance Berkman, Matt Holliday, Octavio Dotel, Edwin Jackson, Rafael Furcal, Jake Westbrook, Arthur Rhodes and Gerald Laird, the Cardinal way became a way to a World Series title, a path those veterans had been trying to find their entire careers.

Furcal, 34, came to St. Louis in a July 31 trade. He made numerous trips to the postseason with Atlanta. He spent five seasons with the Dodgers, who have a rich tradition of their own. But Furcal recognized a "Cardinal way" as soon as he arrived.

"It's one of those things like, everybody is on the same page," Furcal said. "It's a bunch of guys where everybody gets along with each other. Everybody pushes for their teammates and ... everybody tries to, like I say, have fun. Everybody tries to play the game the right way and they are confident about they are going to win. This is the thing, we compete to the 27th out."

Fun, confident, competitive, the right way … those are all part of the formula. It's not just an expression, it's a community spirit and baseball scripture. It's the Cardinal way.

Keep up with the latest Cardinals coverage from our award-winning team of reporters and columnists.






Click any year to explore the Cardinals' World Series that season.

Ring photos (except 2011) from the collection of Jerry P. McNeal, taken by Rudie Ershen.

1926

  • Series recap
  • Photos
  • Videos

The Cardinals defeat the Yankees four games to three to claim their first World Series. Grover Cleveland Alexander wins the second and sixth games, then comes on to save the seventh.

  • 1

    Cardinals 1
    Yankees 2

    Oct. 3, 1926

    Yankee Stadium

     

  • 2

    Cardinals 6
    Yankees 2

    Oct. 3, 1926

    Yankee Stadium

     

  • 3

    Yankees 0
    Cardinals 4

    Oct. 5, 1926

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 4

    Yankees 10
    Cardinals 5

    Oct. 6, 1926

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 5

    Yankees 3
    Cardinals 2

    Oct. 7, 1926

    Sportsman's Park

    (10 innings)

  • 6

    Cardinals 10
    Yankees 2

    Oct. 9, 1926

    Yankee Stadium

     

  • 7

    Cardinals 3
    Yankees 2

    Oct. 10, 1926

    Yankee Stadium

     

  • Miller Huggins (right) saw the genius of Rogers Hornsby early and gave him valuable advice as a rookie. A 1926 reunion after Hornsby had led St. Louis to its first pennant and faced Huggins' New York Yankees in the World Series. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • St. Louis goes wild over the 1926 pennant victory.

  • Grover Cleveland Alexander enters Game 7 in relief, after pitching a complete Game 6

  • Newsreel footage from 1926 World Series

1931

  • Series recap
  • Photos
  • Videos

Pepper Martin, the Wild Horse of the Osage, paces the Cards by stealing five bases, collecting 12 hits and batting .500 as the Cards down the Philadelphia Athletics four games to two.

  • 1

    Athletics 6
    Cardinals 2

    Oct. 1, 1931

    Sportsman's Park

  • 2

    Athletics 0 Cardinals 2

    Oct. 2, 1931

    Sportsman's Park

  • 3

    Cardinals 5
    Athletics 2

    Oct. 5, 1931

    Shibe Park

  • 4

    Cardinals 0
    Athletics 3

    Oct. 6, 1931

    Shibe Park

  • 5

    Cardinals 5
    Athletics 1

    Oct. 7, 1931

    Shibe Park

  • 6

    Athletics 8
    Cardinals 1

    Oct. 9, 1931

    Sportsman's Park

  • 7

    Athletics 2
    Cardinals 4

    Oct. 10, 1931

    Sportsman's Park

  • OCT. 1, 1931 -- Before the start of Game 1 in the 1931 World Series between the Cardinals and the Athletics: Capt. Frankie Frisch of the Cardinals, Eddie Collins of the Athletics, and umpires Nallin, Stark, McGowan and Klem. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 6, 1931 -- Crowds gather outside Hunleth Music Co. at 516 Locust Street to listen to the radio broadcast of the St. Louis Cardinals playing against the Philadelphia Athletics during the Game 4 of the 1931 World Series. (This photograph was taken by Harold Sneckner and is part of the Sievers Collection, Missouri Historical Society)

  • Newsreel: Cards beat A's

  • Newsreel: Hoover attends Game 3 of 1931 World Series

1934

  • Series recap
  • Photos
  • Videos

The "Gas House Gang" wins the National League pennant on the final day of the season, then defeats Detroit in a seven-game World Series. Dizzy and Paul Dean each win two games.

  • 1

    Cardinals 8
    Tigers 3

    Oct. 3, 1934

    Navin Field

     

  • 2

    Cardinals 2
    Tigers 3

    Oct. 4, 1934

    Navin Field

    (12 innings)

  • 3

    Tigers 1
    Cardinals 4

    Oct. 5, 1934

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 4

    Tigers 10
    Cardinals 4

    Oct. 6, 1934

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 5

    Tigers 3
    Cardinals 1

    Oct. 7, 1934

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 6

    Cardinals 4
    Tigers 3

    Oct. 8, 1934

    Navin Field

     

  • 7

    Cardinals 11
    Tigers 0

    Oct. 9, 1934

    Navin Field

     

  • OCT. 5, 1934 -- Detroit Tigers' second baseman Charlie Gehringer (left) talks things over with Joe Medwick, left fielder of the St. Louis Cardinals, just before the start of Game 3 of the World Series in St. Louis. (AP file photo)

  • OCT. 6, 1934 -- In Game 4 of the World Series, the Cardinals sent Dizzy Dean to first base as a pinch runner. The next batter hit a ground ball. The throw to first base struck Dean's head, knocking him unconscious. He was taken to a hospital. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 8, 1934 -- Joe "Ducky" Medwick of the Cardinals stands in left field amid debris thrown by irate fans during Game 6 of the World Series in Detroit. (AP file photo)

  • OCT. 8, 1934 -- Four Cardinals gather in the clubhouse after a 4-3 victory over the Detroit Tigers: Dizzy Dean; his brother Paul, who won his own game with a single; manager Frank Frisch; and catcher Bill DeLancey. (AP file photo)

  • 1934 -- Brothers Paul Dean (left) and Dizzy Dean, are triumphant heroes after the Cardinals won the 1934 Series. The Deans won two games each after Dizzy captured 30 and Paul, a rookie, 29 in the regular season. Between them in the photo is Dizzy's wife, Pat. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • 1934 World Series, 1 of 2

  • 1934 World Series, 2 of 2

1942

  • Series recap
  • Photos
  • Videos

After losing the first game of the Series to the Yankees, the Cards storm back to win four straight. Third baseman Whitey Kurowski hits a two-run, ninth-inning homer in the clincher.

  • 1

    Yankees 7
    Cardinals 4

    Sept. 30, 1942

    Sportsman's Park

  • 2

    Yankees 3
    Cardinals 4

    Oct. 1, 1942

    Sportsman's Park

  • 3

    Cardinals 2
    Yankees 0

    Oct. 3, 1942

    Yankee Stadium

  • 4

    Cardinals 9
    Yankees 6

    Oct. 4, 1942

    Yankee Stadium

  • 5

    Cardinals 4
    Yankees 2

    Oct. 5, 1942

    Yankee Stadium

  • 6

  • 7

  • OCT. 1942: From left: Jimmy Brown, Terry Moore, Enos Slaughter, Stan Musial, Walker Cooper, Johnny Hopp, Whitey Kurowski, Marty Marion, Mort Cooper and Billy Southworth of the St. Louis Cardinals. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • Ticket to Game 1 of the 1942 World Series.

  • OCT. 6, 1942 -- Cardinals fans made their presence known in downtown, celebrating the team's World Series victory. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • 1942 World Series (no sound)

1944

  • Series recap
  • Photos
  • Videos

In a pitching-dominated, all-St. Louis World Series, the Cards down the Browns four games to two. The teams combine to strike out a six-game Series' record 92 batters.

  • 1

    Browns 2
    Cardinals 1

    Oct. 4, 1944

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 2

    Browns 2
    Cardinals 3

    Oct. 5, 1944

    Sportsman's Park

    (11 innings)

  • 3

    Cardinals 2
    Browns 6

    Oct. 6, 1944

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 4

    Cardinals 5
    Browns 1

    Oct. 7, 1944

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 5

    Cardinals 2
    Browns 0

    Oct. 8, 1944

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 6

    Browns 1
    Cardinals 3

    Oct. 9, 1944

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 7

  • OCT. 4, 1944 -- This picture taken from the upper grandstand along left field foul line at Sportsman's Park shows part of the crowd of 33,242 fans that attended opening game of the World Series. Dennis Galehouse of the Browns, the winning pitcher is winding up on the mound, and Danny Litwhiler, left fielder for the Cardinals, is the batter. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 7, 1944 -- Young fans of the Cardinals and the Browns cheer during Game 4. It was a Saturday, so no hooky was necessary. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 9, 1944 -- Children from local Catholic, Protestant and Jewish orphanages meet two of the pros before Game 6. In uniform are (left) Cardinals pitcher Mort Cooper and Browns manager Luke Sewell. Cooper had pitched a complete game in the Cardinals' Game 5 victory. Chaperones are (from left) David Berger and the Rev. H.L. Byrne. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 9, 1944 -- Cardinals catcher Walker Cooper (right) congratulates Ted Wilks, who pitched the final 3 2/3 innings in the championship victory in Game 6. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 9, 1944 -- Cardinals manager Billy Southworth (center) hugs his winning Game 6 pitching staff -- starter Max Lanier (left), who had already taken his shower, and closer Ted Wilks. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • 1944 World Series (no sound)

1946

  • Series recap
  • Photos
  • Videos

Enos Slaughter's "mad dash" from first to home on a double to left-center by Harry Walker is the winning run in a Game 7 win over the Red Sox.

  • 1

    Red Sox 3
    Cardinals 2

    Oct. 6, 1946

    Sportsman's Park

    (10 innings)

  • 2

    Red Sox 0
    Cardinals 3

    Oct. 7, 1946

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 3

    Cardinals 0
    Red Sox 4

    Oct. 9, 1946

    Fenway Park

     

  • 4

    Cardinals 12
    Red Sox 3

    Oct. 10, 1946

    Fenway Park

     

  • 5

    Cardinals 3
    Red Sox 6

    Oct. 11, 1946

    Fenway Park

     

  • 6

    Red Sox 1
    Cardinals 4

    Oct. 13, 1946

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • 7

    Red Sox 3
    Cardinals 4

    Oct. 15, 1946

    Sportsman's Park

     

  • OCT. 6, 1946 -- Robert Curtis, 10, and his father, Walter Curtis, both of Kansas City, were Nos. 1 & 2 when this bleacher window opened in the morning. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 9, 1946 -- Stan Musial of the Cardinals find himself trapped between second and third base in the first inning of Game 3. Behind him is Red Sox pitcher Davd (Boo) Ferriss, who has just thrown to third basemen Pinky Higgins for the tag. Musial had walked, stolen second as Wagner threw low into center field. Then Musial strayed too far off base and Ferriss wheeled fast to catch him flat-footed. Musial, in desperation, then broke for third (International News Photos)

  • OCT. 13, 1946 -- Confetti pours down on bleacherites, whose beaming faces tell the world that the St. Louis Cardinals, scoring three runs in the third, were on their way to the 4-1 victory over Boston's Red Sox in Game 6, to tie up the World Series three-all at Sportsman's Park. (File photo)

  • OCT. 15, 1946 -- Enos Slaughter, slides across home plate scoring the Cardinals' fourth run, which proved to be the series payoff run, in the eighth inning of World Series Game 7 in St. Louis. Umpire is Al Barlick. (AP file photo)

  • OCT. 15, 1946 -- National League president Ford Frick is top man in the Cardinals dressing room after the Redbirds won the World Series, defeating the Boston Red Sox. Clyde Kluttz is in the center, Stan Musial is at lower left, and Dick Sisler (15) is in the lower right. (AP file photo)

  • Enos Slaughter's mad dash

  • World Series 1946 (from "St. Louis Cardinals: The Movie")

1964

  • Series recap
  • Photos
  • Videos

The Cards beat the Yankees in a seven-game series. Bob Gibson wins two games, Ken Boyer hits a grand slam to win Game 4 and Tim McCarver hits a 10th-inning homer to win Game 5.

  • 1

    Yankees 5
    Cardinals 9

    Oct. 7, 1964

    Busch Stadium

     

  • 2

    Yankees 8
    Cardinals 3

    Oct. 8, 1964

    Busch Stadium

     

  • 3

    Cardinals 1
    Yankees 2

    Oct. 10, 1964

    Yankee Stadium

     

  • 4

    Cardinals 4
    Yankees 3

    Oct. 11, 1964

    Yankee Stadium

     

  • 5

    Cardinals 5
    Yankees 2

    Oct. 12, 1964

    Yankee Stadium

    (10 innings)

  • 6

    Yankees 8
    Cardinals 3

    Oct. 14, 1964

    Busch Stadium

     

  • 7

    Yankees 5
    Cardinals 7

    Oct. 15, 1964

    Busch Stadium

     

  • OCT. 8, 1964 -- Cardinals catcher Bob Uecker, clowns around during the workout by playing a tuba near the bleachers at Busch Stadium before the start of the Game 2 of the World Series against the Yankees. (AP file photo)

  • OCT. 12, 1964 -- Bob Gibson rears back and fires during Game 5 of the World Series at Yankee Stadium. Gibson went all the way for a 5-2 win. (AP file photo)

  • OCT. 15, 1964 -- Cardinal third baseman Ken Boyer slides safely into home during the fifth inning of Game 7 of the World Series. Yankees catcher Elston Howard lets the throw from right fielder Mickey Mantle get by him. Boyer scored after the catch.

  • OCT. 15, 1964 -- Cardinals pitcher Bob Gibson is embraced by third baseman Ken Boyer as catcher Tim McCarver rushes up to congratulate the right hander. Their embrace came after the final out in Game 7 of the World Series, which the Cardinals won 7-5, with Gibson going all the way. (AP file photo)

  • OCT. 15, 1964 -- Fans rush onto the field at Busch Stadium after the Cardinals defeated the Yankees in Game 7 of the World Series in St. Louis. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 16, 1964 -- Women whoop it up at Sixth and Olive streets to celebrate the Cardinals' World Series victory. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • Yankees vs. Cardinals

  • Game 7

1967

  • Series recap
  • Photos
  • Videos

Bob Gibson pitches three complete-game wins as the Cards beat Boston in seven games. Lou Brock bats .414 and sets a Series record by stealing seven bases.

  • 1

    Cardinals 2
    Red Sox 1

    Oct. 4, 1967

    Fenway Park

  • 2

    Cardinals 0
    Red Sox 5

    Oct. 5, 1967

    Fenway Park

  • 3

    Red Sox 2
    Cardinals 5

    Oct. 7, 1967

    Busch Stadium

  • 4

    Red Sox 0
    Cardinals 6

    Oct. 8, 1967

    Busch Stadium

  • 5

    Red Sox 3
    Cardinals 1

    Oct. 9, 1967

    Busch Stadium

  • 6

    Cardinals 4
    Red Sox 8

    Oct. 11, 1967

    Fenway Park

  • 7

    Cardinals 7
    Red Sox 2

    Oct. 12, 1967

    Fenway Park

  • OCT. 7, 1967 -- Home plate umpire Frank Umont halts World Series Game 3 in the first inning to warn managers Red Schoendienst of the Cardinals and Dick Williams of the Red Sox about any "brush back" pitches. The incident followed a low, inside pitch by Cardinals hurler Nelson Briles which hit Carl Yastremski in the leg. (Gene Pospeshil / Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 8, 1967 -- Cardinals catcher Tim McCarver presents former Cardinals star Frank Frisch with the baseball that Frisch threw out to start Game 4 of the World Series at Busch Stadium. Flanking Frisch are baseball commissioner William D. Eckert, left, and Cardinal president August A. Busch, Jr. Others from left are Sen. Edward Long, Mrs. Busch, and Senator Stuart Symington. File staff photo

  • OCT. 8, 1967 -- Cardinals cathcer Tim McCarver has a big greeting for pitcher Bob Gibson after Gibson blanked the Boston Red Sox, 6-0 in Game 4 of the World Series at Busch Stadium. (Lynn T. Spence / Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 11, 1967 -- Outfielder Lou Brock's headlong slide beats Red Sox catcher Elston Howard's desperate tag, giving the Cardinals a 2-1 lead in the third inning of Game 6 of the World Series. Brock scored from second on a single by Curt Flood. The Red Sox won 8-4 in Boston. (UPI file photo)

  • OCT. 12, 1967 -- Orlando Cepeda is doused with champagne by Dave Ricketts as the Cardinals whoop it up in their dressing room after winning Game 7 of the World Series, 7-2, in Boston. The Redbirds are (left to right) Tim McCarver, coach Joe Schultz, Nelson Briles, Cepeda, Joe Hoerner, Dal Maxvill, Ricketts, Bob Tolan and Julian Javier. (UPI file photo)

  • Game 1

  • Game 2

  • Game 3

  • Game 4

  • Game 5

  • Game 6

  • Game 7

1982

  • Series recap
  • Photos
  • Videos

The "Whitey-ball" Cardinals rally from a 3-2 deficit to beat the Brewers in seven games, bringing a World Series championship back to St. Louis for the first time in 15 years.

  • 1

    Brewers 10
    Cardinals 0

    Oct. 12, 1982

    Busch Stadium

  • 2

    Brewers 4
    Cardinals 5

    Oct. 13, 1982

    Busch Stadium

  • 3

    Cardinals 6
    Brewers 2

    Oct. 15, 1982

    County Stadium

  • 4

    Cardinals 5
    Brewers 7

    Oct. 16, 1982

    County Stadium

  • 5

    Cardinals 4
    Brewers 6

    Oct. 17, 1982

    County Stadium

  • 6

    Brewers 1
    Cardinals 13

    Oct. 19, 1982

    Busch Stadium

  • 7

    Brewers 3
    Cardinals 6

    Oct. 20, 1982

    Busch Stadium

  • OCT. 13, 1982 -- Ozzie Smith applauds his seventh-inning steal of second base, while Robin Yount dejectedly puts the ball back into his glove during Game 2 of the World Series. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 18, 1982 -- Cardinals fans gather at Lambert Field to welcome the team back to St. Louis after playing three games in Milwaukee. The Cards trailed in the World Series at this point 3-2.

  • OCT. 20, 1982 -- Ozzie Smith throws to first after forcing out Robin Yount in the sixth inning of Game 7 against the Milwaukee Brewers. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 1982 -- Bruce Sutter of the St. Louis Cardinals reacts after one of his two saves against Milwaukee Brewers during the World Series. (Focus on Sport/Getty Images)

  • OCT. 20, 1982 -- The scoreboard says it all as hundreds of Cardinals fans rush onto the diamond to celebrate the Cardinals' 6-3 victory over Milwaukee to win the World Series. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 21, 1982 -- Ecstatic Cardinals fans reach out to touch the hand of Bruce Sutter, right, during a World Series victory parade. The size of the crowd, estimated at more than 100,000, slowed the parade to a crawl as it moved south along Broadway near the Old Courthouse. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • Andujar's costly error

  • Cardinals' three-run sixth

  • Cardinals win the 1982 Series

2006

  • Series recap
  • Photos
  • Videos

With a playoff berth not secured until the regular season's final day, the Cardinals storm through the postseason and beat Detroit four games to one to capture their 10th World Series.

  • 1

    Cardinals 7
    Tigers 2

    Oct. 21, 2006

    Comerica Park

  • 2

    Cardinals 1
    Tigers 3

    Oct. 22, 2006

    Comerica Park

  • 3

    Tigers 0
    Cardinals 5

    Oct. 24, 2006

    Busch Stadium

  • 4

    Tigers 4
    Cardinals 5

    Oct. 26, 2006

    Busch Stadium

  • 5

    Tigers 2
    Cardinals 4

    Oct. 27, 2006

    Busch Stadium

  • 6

  • 7

  • OCT. 22, 2006 -- A smudge on the left hand of Detroit Tigers pitcher Kenny Rogers caused controversy in Game 2 of the World Series at Comerica Park in Detroit, Mich. (Laurie Skrivan / Post-Dispatch)

  • OCT. 24, 2006 -- Cardinals starter Chris Carpenter celebrates after a double play got him safely out of the eighth inning of Game 3 of the World Series. (Chris Lee / Post-Dispatch)

  • OCT. 27, 2006 -- David Eckstein hits a broken-bat RBI single to score Yadier Molina in the second inning of Game 5 of the World Series. (Laurie Skrivan / Post-Dispatch)

  • OCT. 27, 2006 -- Pitcher Adam Wainwright and catcher Yadier Molina celebrate after Wainwright struck out the Tigers' Brandon Inge to win Game 5. (Laurie Skrivan / Post-Dispatch)

  • OCT. 27, 2006 -- Winning pitcher Scott Weaver, tears in his eyes, embraces So Taguchi after Game 5 of the World Series. (Laurie Skrivan / Post-Dispatch)

  • OCT. 29, 2006 -- Fans line Market Street as the St. Louis Cardinals parade in front of Busch Stadium. (Post-Dispatch file photo)

  • OCT. 29, 2006 -- First baseman Albert Pujols waves to the crowd along Market Street during the parade for the World Series champions. (Huy Mach / Post-Dispatch)

  • Recalling the 2006 World Series

  • Wainwright closes out Series (Shannon's call)

2011

  • Series recap
  • Photos
  • Videos

The Cardinals overcome a 10½-game deficit in the final month to win the Wild Card on the season's final day. That success carries over to the postseason, which ends with a Game 7 World Series' win over Texas.

  • 1

    Rangers 2
    Cardinals 3

    Oct. 19, 2011

    Busch Stadium

     

  • 2

    Rangers 2
    Cardinals 1

    Oct. 20, 2011

    Busch Stadium

     

  • 3

    Cardinals 16
    Rangers 7

    Oct. 22, 2011

    Rangers Ballpark

     

  • 4

    Cardinals 0
    Rangers 4

    Oct. 23, 2011

    Rangers Ballpark

     

  • 5

    Cardinals 2
    Rangers 4

    Oct. 24, 2011

    Rangers Ballpark

     

  • 6

    Rangers 9
    Cardinals 10

    Oct. 27, 2011

    Busch Stadium

    (11 innings)

  • 7

    Rangers 2
    Cardinals 6

    Oct. 28, 2011

    Busch Stadium

     

  • OCT. 19, 2011 -- Chris Carpenter looks up after making a sliding play to record an out at first base during Game 1 of the World Series. (Chris Lee/Post-Dispatch)

  • OCT. 22, 2011 -- Albert Pujols swats his third home run of the night in the ninth inning of Game 3 of against the Texas Rangers at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington. The Cardinals won 16-7. (Laurie Skrivan/Post-Dispatch)

  • OCT. 24, 2011 -- Cardinals manager Tony La Russa talks with pitcher Lance Lynn before relieving him in the eighth inning of Game 5 of the World Series. Lynn faced one batter and appeared to walk him intentionally. (Chris Lee/Post-Dispatch)

  • OCT. 27, 2011 -- David Freese celebrates after hitting the game-winning home run for the Cardinals. Texas pitcher Mark Lowe (right) gave up the homer in the 11th inning of Game 6 in St. Louis. (Chris Lee/Post-Dispatch)

  • OCT. 28, 2011 -- Cardinals pitcher Chris Carpenter races up the dugout steps onto the field as outfielder Lance Berkman embraces manager Tony La Russa after the final out of Game 7. (Chris Lee/Post-Dispatch)

  • OCT. 28, 2011 -- Cardinals third baseman David Freese celebrates with fans on the field after the Cardinals won their 11th championship. (Chris Lee/Post-Dispatch)

  • OCT. 28, 2011 -- Cardinals players including Mitchell Boggs (center) celebrate in the clubhouse after Game 7 of the World Series. (Chris Lee/Post-Dispatch)

  • Carpenter's Game 1 first-base dive

  • Pujols' three homers in Game 3

  • Cards win the Series